The End


LAND OF THE ART
This page as it was all this time won't exist anymore.
I won't publish more commentaries. I won't publish more mythological tales. I need a change, I have been like 1 year doing the same everyday, I have worked very hard. I now have a book of +300 pages compilating the commentaries, in spanish and in english. I also have a little book of 75 pages about the tales, in english and spanish too. So, it's enough. Well, you know, this can't be forever, because I'm human, and can change... but it was nice while it was. I hope you have learnt a lot with this page. But this is not over yet.
This page will continue but with other kind of content.
The most important page talking about this one now is Researches. There I will continue doing long posts about topics I want to research.
History of Art videoseries. The series of the history of art I was doing, will also continue, but it will be developed with time, along my university career. I can say it will take 3-4 years to complete all the videos there, so, no hurry.
Pdfs/power points of History of Art (only spanish). That will also continue in the same way as the videoseries.

That is all. You are free to leave or to stay. But think that you won't get the same content you got in the past... and with the same periodicity. I will post now here when I want, when I feel I have to do something.
Anyway, I am open for doubts. If you have any doubt about an artwork/period/whatever, you can send me a message here, or leave a comment, and I will answer, even, I can do a post about that. It is not a bad idea.
About the sidepages, all will be down except Space Art and History of Music. I will post more info about that in these pages, and an announce here too, later.
Thank you for your support. I hope you enjoyed this great journey, that although different now, is not over.

Death of King Arthur

Death of King Arthur
  

            This tale belongs to the Arthuric Mythology.
It all begins when Mordred, son of Arthur and Morgana, finds the idyll of Geneva, wife of Arthur, and Lancelot, and he tells it to Arthur, and he is forced to condemn to the stake to his wife, according to the laws of the time. Lancelot saves the queen and escapes with her to France.
Athur persecuted Lancelot and leave the kingdom to his son Mordred, who seizes the throne and tries to seduce the Queen Guinevere. At the return of Arthur and his knights he must fight to regain the throne, at the Battle of Camlann. Arthur kills his son, to who crosses with his spear. But Mordred, before he died, wounded fatally to Arthur and dies.
The story tells that his sister Morgana took the body of Arthur in a boat to the shores of Avalon with other queens-tale more that could have been Igraine, Elaine, the Lady of the Lake (which Excalibur was returned), Queen of North Wales, Queen of the Badlands or the Queen of Beyond the Sea. Later, when Geneva died, she was buried by Lancelot beside the grave of King Arthur.

Tristan and Isolde

Tristan and Isolde
  

            This tale belongs to the Celtic and Irish Mythology.
            The story tells how Tristan and Isolde by mistake drink a love potion intended for Isolde and her fiance, the King Mark, which triggered the tragedy. They are separated, Tristan goes to France and get married, but he is still in love with Isolde. In the end, he falls mortally wounded and call her.
Isolde comes to his call, but the jealous wife makes him believe that not, so Tristan dies disconsolate. When Isolde comes, she dies too. Both are buried together, and in their graves grow two trees with branches intertwined forever.

Octopus and Rat

Octopus and Rat
  

            This tale belongs to the Oceanic Mythology.
One day, three terrestrial animals, the flying fish, the crab and the rat, joined a flock of birds to travel in a canoe. When a kingfisher drilled a hole in the bottom of the canoe, it was filled with water and sank. All the birds flew. The flying fish imitated them, but fell into the water and saw that he could swim. The crab fell on the reefs and saw that he could move smoothly.
The rat, however, was struggling to keep from drowning when an octopus passing responded to his cries of anguish and agreed to bring him to the coast. The rat refused to hang from the tentacles and so climbed to the head of the octopus, where he urinated and defecated on it. As it was so capricious, he would not jump the octopus and forced him to take her to the mainland to avoid wet feet. Then the rat, badly said the octopus that smacked his own head.
Upon discovering his droppings, the octopus was angry and that is why he has lumps on his head and always attacks fake rats used as bait by fishermen.

Alvíssmál

Alvíssmál
  

This tale belongs to the Norse Germanic Mythology.
Alvíssmál or the Lay of Alvíss is a poem of the Poetic Edda. It tells the tale of Alvíss, or All-Wise, who claimed to Thrudr, Thor's daughter, as his wife. Thor opposed, but there was a promise by which it was made in the absence of Thor. Then the thunder god told him to do a series of questions, and if he answer to all, he could marry with his daughter. Thor asked many things, and Alvíss knew all the answers, but eventually dawned, and the dwarf Alvíss turned to stone, as the dwarves in Norse mythology turn into stone with sunlight.

El Dorado

El Dorado


            This tale belongs to the Southamerican Mythology, concretely, to the Chibcha people of Colombia.
          The chibcha were a people of Colombia who lived between 900 and 1450. Their lifestyle and economy revolved around metallurgy, standing out the gold, which they said it had mystical qualities, something well reflected in the history of the Golden Man, which we know as El Dorado.
The story of El Dorado is based on a chibcha ritual taking place when a new chief is appointed. Before the opening ceremony, the future chief spent several days of fasting and contemplation. Once purified, he went to the lake Guatavita. In the sacred lake, took off all his clothes and his entourage will smeared his body with an adhesive resin, and then gold dust was sprinkled on him.


This man then went in a raft loaded with treasures of gold and other precious materials. Arriving at the center, all were silent, and the chief and his assistants threw to water the carrying objects as an offering to the gods. He could even jump into the sea to take the gold dust and increase the offering. Apart from this ritual, usually the chibcha people also threw valuables to the Iguaque lake to worship the goddess Bachue, the mother goddess of fertility.
When the Spaniards heard these stories, they believed to have come to the land of infinite richness and the lust for gold grew. The name El Dorado stands for a utopian fantasy of richness and power.

Battle of Helm’s Deep

The Battle of Helm’s Deep
  

            This tale belongs to the Legendarium of JRR Tolkien.
          The Battle of Helm’s Deep, or the Battle of the Hornburg, is a battle during the War of the Ring, between the 3rd and 4th of March 3019 of the Third Age. In this battle the men of Rohan faced against the armies of Isengard. Also were participating several members of the Fellowship and the huorns. The version told here is the one in the book.
Faced with the threat of Isengard, the men of Rohan took refuge in Helm's Deep. The men that were able to defend the fortress went there, while the vast majority of the population went to Dunharrow. They had about 2,000 soldiers. Isengard forces were composed of 10,000 enemies, including orcs, halforcs, wargs, dunlendings and uruk-hai. Their goal was to completely annihilate the people of Rohan, to leave Gondor without allies for Sauron to attack them. At Helm's Deep were Aragorn, Legolas, Gimli, Théoden, Éomer, Háma, Gamelin, among others. Gandalf left, nobody knew for what at first but he had gone for Enkenbrand to join forces: the Rohan men dispersed, especially the Westfold ones and the survivors of the Battle of the Fords of Isen. Something curious is that in front of the fortress, where before there was a plain, now there was a forest.


Isengard forces managed to breach the wall and destroy the main gate of the Hornburg, and so entered the fortress. All seemed lost, because too, the forces of Isengard were far outnumbered compared with the forces of the rohirrim. I should name the attack to Aglarond, or the Glittering Caves, where Gimli was a great help to the survival of civilian refugees there. Théoden and the Royal Guard were inside the Hornburg, and when the uruk-hai destroyed the gate, rode with Aragorn between them, to die honorably.
But it was not so, as Gandalf the White arrived on time with Erkenbrand and an army of 2,000 rohirrims to help the men of Helm's Deep. The enemy began to flee towards the mysterious forest that appeared near the fortress, which was a huorns forest, beings half-ents and half-trees, who massacred the orcs. The destruction of Isengard forces was practically total, although many rohirrims perished too. It was a victory for the Free Peoples. After the defeat of Isengard, Sauron declared open war on all Middle-earth.